6 Aug 2016

Chess Tactics – Knight Fork Part-2

In the first part of this lesson, we had a look at a few examples of the “knight fork” and carried out some training exercises. If you missed it, you can find it here. In the second part, we’ll see a few more examples and exercises to understand the different patterns of this tactical motif completely.

Example – 6
Knight fork
White to play

White’s rook is under attack but he recognizes the amazing knight fork pattern here. White starts with a check: 1.Nd7+ Kf7 is the only move to support the rook. And now White makes some forcing moves 2.Rxe8 Rxe8 3.Rxe8 Kxe8 and here comes the fork 4. Nf6+ 1-0

Example – 7
Knight fork
Black to play

It’s Black’s turn here. To attain the “main fork”, he starts with a “mini-fork”: 1…Nb3 and White has to move the rook. 2. Rb1and now comes the main fork 2…Nd4, attacking both the queen on e2 and the bishop on b5. 0-1

Example – 8
Knight fork
Black to play

It’s Black’s turn. To attain the fork, he starts with a sacrifice, winning a pawn: 1…Bxd5 2.exd5. Now Black wins the rook with the fork 2…Nc2+ – after 3.Rxc2 Rxe3, Black is an exchange up. 0-1

As usual, simply looking at examples is not enough – let’s try to solve a couple of problems now. :)

Exercise – 4
Knight fork
Black to play

Exercise – 5
Knight fork
White to play

After calculating all possible variations, you may check the solution here.

P.S. Did you like this article? Would you like to see similar articles on other tactical motifs? Feel free to write your thoughts and feedback in the comments below. :)

Recommended

Get “Calculate Till Mate”, which will sharpen your tactical, calculation, and visualization skills, and “Your Winning Plan” to learn how to read the chess board and plan like the PROs.

No comments:

Post a comment